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Self Funders

Self-Funders

County Council - General Info

http://www.leics.gov.uk/index/social_services/asc_support/asc_general_info/social_care_legal_financial_information/asc_paying/social_care_paying_towards_support/asc_how_much_to_pay.htm

How Much do People Have to Pay

·    How much

·    Examples

·    Related links


How much

If someone is not automatically exempt (see links below for exemptions) from paying a charge, the amount they have to pay depends on two things:

·    What services, and how many services, they receive

·    How much they can afford to pay

The Council therefore does two calculations:

·    A calculation of the maximum that anyone is ever asked to contribute for the services they receive - for details of how this is worked out see maximum charges for services at home and in the community

·    A calculation of the maximum that each person can afford to contribute – for details of how this is worked out see charges for services at home and in the community - savings/capital

What someone actually pays is the lower of the two.

Examples

The way the calculations are done is slightly different depending on whether the person has a Personal Budgetfrom the Council.  

·    Examples of how the Council works out how much someone pays – if they have a Personal Budget

·    Examples of how the Council works out how much someone pays – if they do not have a Personal Budget

Related Links

·    Exemption from Charges for Services at Home and in the Community

·    Exemption from Charges for Housing Related Support (Supporting People)

·    Paying for social care and support long term

·    Paying Towards your Support(link to Paying Towards your Support)

http://www.leics.gov.uk/index/social_services/asc_support/asc_general_info/social_care_legal_financial_information/asc_paying/social_care_paying_towards_support/asc_care_home_charges/asc_care_homes_charges_savings.htm

Care Home Charges – Capital/Savings

·    Capital/savings

·    Deprivation of capital

·    If you think you have capital/savings above the £23,250 limit

·    Related links

·    External links

Capital/savings

If you have savings above £23,250 you are required to pay the full cost of the home at the same rate as the cost of the care home to the council.

The law on what counts as savings and capital for this purpose is very complicated and this guidance cannot cover every situation, but in summary:

Capital/savings that are counted towards the £23,250 include:

·    Cash held in banks, building societies, etc

·    National Savings Certificates

·    Premium Bonds

·    Stocks and shares

·    Any buildings, land, or houses that you do not live in

Capital/savings that are not counted towards the £23,250 include:

·    The value of a house you normally live in (for example because you are only going to be in the home temporarily)

·    The value of a house you used to live in for the first 12 weeks that you are permanently living at the home

·    The value of a house you used to live in, but that is occupied by someone who is your partner, or a relative who is 60 or over or disabled, or your child and is under 18

·    The surrender value of any life insurance or annuity

·    Personal possessions

See our information sheets on Savings over £23,250 with access to funds (60kb .doc)and Savings over £23,250 but no access to funds (65kb .doc.)for further information.

Deprivation of capital

If you have deprived yourself (for example, given away) capital that would count towards the £23,250, in order to reduce the amount that you pay to the Council, the Council may treat you as still having it and charge you accordingly.  In some circumstances, if you can’t pay the charge the Council may require the person who received the capital from you to pay it for you.

See our information sheet on Capital and Gifting of Assets (60kb .doc)for further information.

If you think you have capital/savings above the £23,250 limit

You should still ask the Council to do a financial assessmentof how much you can afford to pay if:

·    There is any doubt or question about whether your capital will count for the financial assessment, or

·    There is a reasonable chance that your capital will drop below £23,250 while you are at the home, or

·    The capital is in a form that you cannot use straight away (for example a house that would need to be sold)

If you have capital that is in a form that you cannot use straight away (for example a house that would need to be sold), the Council may be able to pay for your place at the care home and enter into a deferred payment agreementwith you that means you will repay the Council when the house is sold.

Related links

·    Care home charges

·    Financial assessment for living in a care home

·    Care home “top ups”

·    Care home deferred payments scheme

·    NHS continuing healthcare

·    Paying for social care and support long term

·    Charges for services at home and in the community - savings/capital

·    Care home funding

External links

·    The Money Advice Servicegives free impartial information and advice about funding long term care and support.